Wednesday, March 04, 2015

Rutherford B. Hayes is inaugurated in a private ceremony - Mar 03, 1877 - HISTORY.com

Rutherford B. Hayes is inaugurated in a private ceremony - Mar 03, 1877 - HISTORY.com:

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/rutherford-b-hayes-is-inaugurated-in-a-private-ceremony?et_cid=72291116&et_rid=704749232&linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.history.com%2fthis-day-in-history%2frutherford-b-hayes-is-inaugurated-in-a-private-ceremony

"On this day in 1877, Rutherford B. Hayes is sworn in as the 19th president of the United States in the Red Room of the White House. Two days later, Hayes was again inaugurated in a public ceremony.

 Some historical accounts claim that Hayes’ first swearing-in ceremony had occurred in secret due to threats made on the new president’s life. Other accounts say that since inaugural day fell on a Sunday, Congress decided to perform a private ceremony the Saturday before the official inauguration date and repeat the performance in public the following Monday.

 It is not beyond the realm of possibility that Hayes’ life had been threatened, as his 1876 election had been hotly contested. For four months, competing factions in Congress as well as their like-minded countrymen argued over the election results. Hayes had lost the popular vote by a slim margin of 250,000 votes, yet appeared to have won a majority in the Electoral College.

Accusations of fraudulent Electoral College vote counts in three southern states (including Florida, which would again play a major role in a contested election in 2000) led Congress to form an electoral commission to make the final decision. On March 2, the commission voted along party lines and put the Republican, Hayes, in office."

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/rutherford-b-hayes-is-inaugurated-in-a-private-ceremony?et_cid=72291116&et_rid=704749232&linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.history.com%2fthis-day-in-history%2frutherford-b-hayes-is-inaugurated-in-a-private-ceremony

'via Blog this'
*****

Bibi Netanyahu's Speech to Congress March 3, 2015


Transcript of Netanyahu's Speech to Congress

Speaker of the House John Boehner,

President Pro Tem Senator Orrin Hatch,

Senator Majority Leader Mitch McConnell,

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi,

And House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy,
I also want to acknowledge Senator, Democratic Leader Harry Reid. Harry, it’s good to see you back on your feet. I guess it’s true what they say, you can’t keep a good man down.

My friends, I’m deeply humbled by the opportunity to speak for a third time before the most important legislative body in the world, the U.S. Congress. I want to thank you all for being here today. I know that my speech has been the subject of much controversy. I deeply regret that some perceive my being here as political. That was never my intention.

I want to thank you, Democrats and Republicans, for your common support for Israel, year after year, decade after decade. I know that no matter on which side of the aisle you sit, you stand with Israel. The remarkable alliance between Israel and the United States has always been above politics. It must always remain above politics. Because America and Israel, we share a common destiny, the destiny of promised lands that cherish freedom and offer hope. Israel is grateful for the support of America’s people and of America’s presidents, from Harry Truman to Barack Obama.

We appreciate all that President Obama has done for Israel. Now, some of that is widely known. Some of that is widely known, like strengthening security cooperation and intelligence sharing, opposing anti-Israel resolutions at the U.N.

Some of what the president has done for Israel is less well-known. I called him in 2010 when we had the Carmel forest fire, and he immediately agreed to respond to my request for urgent aid. In 2011, we had our embassy in Cairo under siege, and again, he provided vital assistance at the crucial moment. Or his support for more missile interceptors during our operation last summer when we took on Hamas terrorists. In each of those moments, I called the president, and he was there.

And some of what the president has done for Israel might never be known, because it touches on some of the most sensitive and strategic issues that arise between an American president and an Israeli prime minister. But I know it, and I will always be grateful to President Obama for that support.

And Israel is grateful to you, the American Congress, for your support, for supporting us in so many ways, especially in generous military assistance and missile defense, including Iron Dome. Last summer, millions of Israelis were protected from thousands of Hamas rockets because this capital dome helped build our Iron Dome.

Thank you, America. Thank you for everything you’ve done for Israel.

My friends, I’ve come here today because, as Prime Minister of Israel, I feel a profound obligation to speak to you about an issue that could well threaten the survival of my country and the future of my people: Iran’s quest for nuclear weapons.

We’re an ancient people. In our nearly 4,000 years of history, many have tried repeatedly to destroy the Jewish people. Tomorrow night, on the Jewish holiday of Purim, we’ll read the Book of Esther. We’ll read of a powerful Persian viceroy named Haman, who plotted to destroy the Jewish people some 2,500 years ago. But a courageous Jewish woman, Queen Esther, exposed the plot and gave for the Jewish people the right to defend themselves against their enemies. The plot was foiled. Our people were saved.

Today the Jewish people face another attempt by yet another Persian potentate to destroy us. Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei spews the oldest hatred, the oldest hatred of anti-Semitism with the newest technology. He tweets that Israel must be annihilated – he tweets. You know, in Iran, there isn’t exactly free Internet. But he tweets in English that Israel must be destroyed.

For those who believe that Iran threatens the Jewish state, but not the Jewish people, listen to Hassan Nasrallah, the leader of Hezbollah, Iran’s chief terrorist proxy. He said: If all the Jews gather in Israel, it will save us the trouble of chasing them down around the world.

But Iran’s regime is not merely a Jewish problem, any more than the Nazi regime was merely a Jewish problem. The 6 million Jews murdered by the Nazis were but a fraction of the 60 million people killed in World War II. So, too, Iran’s regime poses a grave threat, not only to Israel, but also the peace of the entire world. To understand just how dangerous Iran would be with nuclear weapons, we must fully understand the nature of the regime. The people of Iran are very talented people. They’re heirs to one of the world’s great civilizations. But in 1979, they were hijacked by religious zealots – religious zealots who imposed on them immediately a dark and brutal dictatorship.

That year, the zealots drafted a constitution, a new one for Iran. It directed the revolutionary guards not only to protect Iran’s borders, but also to fulfill the ideological mission of jihad. The regime’s founder, Ayatollah Khomeini, exhorted his followers to “export the revolution throughout the world.”

I’m standing here in Washington, D.C. and the difference is so stark. America’s founding document promises life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Iran’s founding document pledges death, tyranny, and the pursuit of jihad. And as states are collapsing across the Middle East, Iran is charging into the void to do just that.

Iran’s goons in Gaza, its lackeys in Lebanon, its revolutionary guards on the Golan Heights are clutching Israel with three tentacles of terror. Backed by Iran, Assad is slaughtering Syrians. Backed by Iran, Shiite militias are rampaging through Iraq. Backed by Iran, Houthis are seizing control of Yemen, threatening the strategic straits at the mouth of the Red Sea. Along with the Straits of Hormuz, that would give Iran a second choke-point on the world’s oil supply. Just last week, near Hormuz, Iran carried out a military exercise blowing up a mock U.S. aircraft carrier. That’s just last week, while they’re having nuclear talks with the United States. But unfortunately, for the last 36 years, Iran’s attacks against the United States have been anything but mock. And the targets have been all too real.

Iran took dozens of Americans hostage in Tehran, murdered hundreds of American soldiers, Marines, in Beirut, and was responsible for killing and maiming thousands of American service men and women in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Beyond the Middle East, Iran attacks America and its allies through its global terror network. It blew up the Jewish community center and the Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires. It helped Al Qaida bomb U.S. embassies in Africa. It even attempted to assassinate the Saudi ambassador, right here in Washington, D.C.

In the Middle East, Iran now dominates four Arab capitals, Baghdad, Damascus, Beirut and Sanaa. And if Iran’s aggression is left unchecked, more will surely follow.

So, at a time when many hope that Iran will join the community of nations, Iran is busy gobbling up the nations. We must all stand together to stop Iran’s march of conquest, subjugation and terror.

Now, two years ago, we were told to give President Rouhani and Foreign Minister Zarif a chance to bring change and moderation to Iran. Some change! Some moderation! Rouhani’s government hangs gays, persecutes Christians, jails journalists and executes even more prisoners than before.

Last year, the same Zarif who charms Western diplomats laid a wreath at the grave of Imad Mughniyeh. Imad Mughniyeh is the terrorist mastermind who spilled more American blood than any other terrorist besides Osama bin Laden. I’d like to see someone ask him a question about that.

Iran’s regime is as radical as ever, its cries of “Death to America,” that same America that it calls the “Great Satan,” as loud as ever. Now, this shouldn’t be surprising, because the ideology of Iran’s revolutionary regime is deeply rooted in militant Islam, and that’s why this regime will always be an enemy of America.

Don’t be fooled. The battle between Iran and ISIS doesn’t turn Iran into a friend of America. Iran and ISIS are competing for the crown of militant Islam. One calls itself the Islamic Republic. The other calls itself the Islamic State. Both want to impose a militant Islamic empire first on the region and then on the entire world. They just disagree among themselves who will be the ruler of that empire.

In this deadly game of thrones, there’s no place for America or for Israel, no peace for Christians, Jews or Muslims who don’t share the Islamist medieval creed, no rights for women, no freedom for anyone. So when it comes to Iran and ISIS, the enemy of your enemy is your enemy.

The difference is that ISIS is armed with butcher knives, captured weapons and YouTube, whereas Iran could soon be armed with intercontinental ballistic missiles and nuclear bombs. We must always remember – I’ll say it one more time – the greatest danger facing our world is the marriage of militant Islam with nuclear weapons. To defeat ISIS and let Iran get nuclear weapons would be to win the battle, but lose the war. We can’t let that happen.

But that, my friends, is exactly what could happen, if the deal now being negotiated is accepted by Iran. That deal will not prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons. It would all but guarantee that Iran gets those weapons, lots of them.

Let me explain why. While the final deal has not yet been signed, certain elements of any potential deal are now a matter of public record. You don’t need intelligence agencies and secret information to know this. You can Google it. Absent a dramatic change, we know for sure that any deal with Iran will include two major concessions to Iran.

The first major concession would leave Iran with a vast nuclear infrastructure, providing it with a short breakout time to the bomb. Breakout time is the time it takes to amass enough weapons-grade uranium or plutonium for a nuclear bomb.

According to the deal, not a single nuclear facility would be demolished. Thousands of centrifuges used to enrich uranium would be left spinning. Thousands more would be temporarily disconnected, but not destroyed.
Because Iran’s nuclear program would be left largely intact, Iran’s breakout time would be very short – about a year by U.S. assessment, even shorter by Israel’s.

And if Iran’s work on advanced centrifuges, faster and faster centrifuges, is not stopped, that breakout time could still be shorter, a lot shorter.

True, certain restrictions would be imposed on Iran’s nuclear program and Iran’s adherence to those restrictions would be supervised by international inspectors. But here’s the problem. You see, inspectors document violations; they don’t stop them.

Inspectors knew when North Korea broke to the bomb, but that didn’t stop anything. North Korea turned off the cameras, kicked out the inspectors. Within a few years, it got the bomb.

Now, we’re warned that within five years North Korea could have an arsenal of 100 nuclear bombs.

Like North Korea, Iran, too, has defied international inspectors. It’s done that on at least three separate occasions – 2005, 2006, 2010. Like North Korea, Iran broke the locks, shut off the cameras. Now, I know this is not going to come as a shock to any of you, but Iran not only defies inspectors, it also plays a pretty good game of hide-and-cheat with them.

The U.N.’s nuclear watchdog agency, the IAEA, said again yesterday that Iran still refuses to come clean about its military nuclear program. Iran was also caught – caught twice, not once, twice – operating secret nuclear facilities in Natanz and Qom, facilities that inspectors didn’t even know existed.

Right now, Iran could be hiding nuclear facilities that we don’t know about, the U.S. and Israel. As the former head of inspections for the IAEA said in 2013, he said, “If there’s no undeclared installation today in Iran, it will be the first time in 20 years that it doesn’t have one.” Iran has proven time and again that it cannot be trusted. And that’s why the first major concession is a source of great concern. It leaves Iran with a vast nuclear infrastructure and relies on inspectors to prevent a breakout. That concession creates a real danger that Iran could get to the bomb by violating the deal.

But the second major concession creates an even greater danger that Iran could get to the bomb by keeping the deal. Because virtually all the restrictions on Iran’s nuclear program will automatically expire in about a decade. Now, a decade may seem like a long time in political life, but it’s the blink of an eye in the life of a nation. It’s a blink of an eye in the life of our children. We all have a responsibility to consider what will happen when Iran’s nuclear capabilities are virtually unrestricted and all the sanctions will have been lifted. Iran would then be free to build a huge nuclear capacity that could produce many, many nuclear bombs.

Iran’s Supreme Leader says that openly. He says Iran plans to have 190,000 centrifuges, not 6,000 or even the 19,000 that Iran has today, but 10 times that amount – 190,000 centrifuges enriching uranium. With this massive capacity, Iran could make the fuel for an entire nuclear arsenal and this in a matter of weeks, once it makes that decision.

My long-time friend, John Kerry, Secretary of State, confirmed last week that Iran could legitimately possess that massive centrifuge capacity when the deal expires.

Now I want you to think about that. The foremost sponsor of global terrorism could be weeks away from having enough enriched uranium for an entire arsenal of nuclear weapons and this with full international legitimacy.

And by the way, if Iran’s intercontinental ballistic missile program is not part of the deal, and so far, Iran refuses to even put it on the negotiating table. Well, Iran could have the means to deliver that nuclear arsenal to the far-reaching corners of the Earth, including to every part of the United States. So you see, my friends, this deal has two major concessions: one, leaving Iran with a vast nuclear program and two, lifting the restrictions on that program in about a decade. That’s why this deal is so bad. It doesn’t block Iran’s path to the bomb; it paves Iran’s path to the bomb.

So why would anyone make this deal? Because they hope that Iran will change for the better in the coming years, or they believe that the alternative to this deal is worse?

Well, I disagree. I don’t believe that Iran’s radical regime will change for the better after this deal. This regime has been in power for 36 years, and its voracious appetite for aggression grows with each passing year. This deal would only whet Iran’s appetite for more.

Would Iran be less aggressive when sanctions are removed and its economy is stronger? If Iran is gobbling up four countries right now while it’s under sanctions, how many more countries will Iran devour when sanctions are lifted? Would Iran fund less terrorism when it has mountains of cash with which to fund more terrorism?

Why should Iran’s radical regime change for the better when it can enjoy the best of both worlds: aggression abroad, prosperity at home?

This is a question that everyone asks in our region. Israel’s neighbors, Iran’s neighbors, know that Iran will become even more aggressive and sponsor even more terrorism when its economy is unshackled and it’s been given a clear path to the bomb. And many of these neighbors say they’ll respond by racing to get nuclear weapons of their own. So this deal won’t change Iran for the better; it will only change the Middle East for the worse. A deal that’s supposed to prevent nuclear proliferation would instead spark a nuclear arms race in the most dangerous part of the planet.

This deal won’t be a farewell to arms. It would be a farewell to arms control. And the Middle East would soon be crisscrossed by nuclear tripwires. A region where small skirmishes can trigger big wars would turn into a nuclear tinderbox.

If anyone thinks this deal kicks the can down the road, think again. When we get down that road, we’ll face a much more dangerous Iran, a Middle East littered with nuclear bombs and a countdown to a potential nuclear nightmare.

Ladies and gentlemen, I’ve come here today to tell you we don’t have to bet the security of the world on the hope that Iran will change for the better. We don’t have to gamble with our future and with our children’s future.

We can insist that restrictions on Iran’s nuclear program not be lifted for as long as Iran continues its aggression in the region and in the world. Before lifting those restrictions, the world should demand that Iran do three things. First, stop its aggression against its neighbors in the Middle East. Second, stop supporting terrorism around the world. And third, stop threatening to annihilate my country, Israel, the one and only Jewish state.

If the world powers are not prepared to insist that Iran change its behavior before a deal is signed, at the very least they should insist that Iran change its behavior before a deal expires. If Iran changes its behavior, the restrictions would be lifted. If Iran doesn’t change its behavior, the restrictions should not be lifted. If Iran wants to be treated like a normal country, let it act like a normal country.

My friends, what about the argument that there’s no alternative to this deal, that Iran’s nuclear know-how cannot be erased, that its nuclear program is so advanced that the best we can do is delay the inevitable, which is essentially what the proposed deal seeks to do?

Well, nuclear know-how without nuclear infrastructure doesn’t get you very much. A racecar driver without a car can’t drive. A pilot without a plane can’t fly. Without thousands of centrifuges, tons of enriched uranium or heavy water facilities, Iran can’t make nuclear weapons.

Iran’s nuclear program can be rolled back well-beyond the current proposal by insisting on a better deal and keeping up the pressure on a very vulnerable regime, especially given the recent collapse in the price of oil.

Now, if Iran threatens to walk away from the table – and this often happens in a Persian bazaar – call their bluff. They’ll be back, because they need the deal a lot more than you do.

And by maintaining the pressure on Iran and on those who do business with Iran, you have the power to make them need it even more. My friends, for over a year, we’ve been told that no deal is better than a bad deal. Well, this is a bad deal. It’s a very bad deal. We’re better off without it.

Now we’re being told that the only alternative to this bad deal is war. That’s just not true. The alternative to this bad deal is a much better deal: a better deal that doesn’t leave Iran with a vast nuclear infrastructure and such a short breakout time; a better deal that keeps the restrictions on Iran’s nuclear program in place until Iran’s aggression ends; a better deal that won’t give Iran an easy path to the bomb; a better deal that Israel and its neighbors may not like, but with which we could live, literally. And no country has a greater stake – no country has a greater stake than Israel in a good deal that peacefully removes this threat.

Ladies and gentlemen,

History has placed us at a fateful crossroads. We must now choose between two paths. One path leads to a bad deal that will at best curtail Iran’s nuclear ambitions for a while, but it will inexorably lead to a nuclear-armed Iran whose unbridled aggression will inevitably lead to war. The second path, however difficult, could lead to a much better deal that would prevent a nuclear-armed Iran, a nuclearized Middle East and the horrific consequences of both to all of humanity.

You don’t have to read Robert Frost to know. You have to live life to know that the difficult path is usually the one less traveled, but it will make all the difference for the future of my country, the security of the Middle East and the peace of the world, the peace we all desire.

My friends, standing up to Iran is not easy. Standing up to dark and murderous regimes never is. With us today is Holocaust survivor and Nobel Prize winner Elie Wiesel. Elie, your life and work inspires to give meaning to the words, “Never Again.” And I wish I could promise you, Elie, that the lessons of history have been learned. I can only urge the leaders of the world not to repeat the mistakes of the past. Not to sacrifice the future for the present; not to ignore aggression in the hopes of gaining an illusory peace.

But I can guarantee you this, the days when the Jewish people remained passive in the face of genocidal enemies, those days are over. We are no longer scattered among the nations, powerless to defend ourselves. We restored our sovereignty in our ancient home. And the soldiers who defend our home have boundless courage. For the first time in 100 generations, we, the Jewish people, can defend ourselves.

This is why as Prime Minister of Israel, I can promise you one more thing: Even if Israel has to stand alone, Israel will stand. But I know that Israel does not stand alone. I know that America stands with Israel. I know that you stand with Israel. You stand with Israel because you know that the story of Israel is not only the story of the Jewish people but of the human spirit that refuses again and again to succumb to history’s horrors.

Facing me right up there in the gallery, overlooking all of us in this chamber is the image of Moses. Moses led our people from slavery to the gates of the Promised Land. And before the people of Israel entered the Land of Israel, Moses gave us a message that has steeled our resolve for thousands of years. I leave you with his message today, “Be strong and resolute, neither fear nor dread them.”

My friends, may Israel and America always stand together, strong and resolute. May we neither fear nor dread the challenges ahead. May we face the future with confidence, strength and hope.


May God bless the State of Israel and may God bless the United States of America. Thank you. You’re wonderful. Thank you, America.
*****

Carroll County Md. Promotes Roberta Windham to County Administrator

County Promotes Windham to County Administrator





Westminster, Tuesday, March 3, 2015 – The Carroll County Board of Commissioners is pleased to announce the promotion of Ms. Roberta Windham, as the Carroll County Administrator. Ms. Windham will assume this new role on Thursday, March 5th.

Ms. Windham earned her Bachelor’s degree in Political Science and Spanish from Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania in 1983 and earned her Juris Doctorate Degree from University of Baltimore in 1992. 

She is a member of the Maryland Bar Association.

“On behalf of the Board, I would like to say that we are very pleased to promote Roberta to this new position,” said Commissioner Stephen Wantz. “I have known Roberta for many years and she has always been professional, hardworking and dedicated. She brings extensive knowledge of the workings of county government and will be able to ‘hit the ground running’ in this new role. Roberta’s extensive experience and expertise will be an asset to the county.”

Prior to assuming her responsibilities in the Commissioners’ Office 4 years ago, Ms. Windham managed her own legal practice which focused on Estates and Trusts Law.

She has lived in Eldersburg with her husband, Gary, and 2 daughters, Sarah and Katherine, since 1994.


Please help Carroll County Government welcome Ms. Roberta Windham to this new role.

Related: Chief of staff's budget prowess not total sum of legacy http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/carroll/westminster/ph-ce-steve-powell-0504-20140504,0,5082719.story

Powell joins distinguished club of former Carroll County Chiefs of Staff Eagle Archives by Kevin Dayhoff May 5, 2014





The recent resignation of Steve Powell, chief of staff for the Board of Commissioners for Carroll County, brought back memories of other distinguished individuals in county history who have endured that arduous position: Richard "Pat" Hill, Robert A. "Max" Bair and George A. Grier, to name a few.

In full disclosure, this writer had the honor and privilege to have worked with every county chief of staff — executive assistant — since the position was created in 1959.

[…]

Whether you agreed or disagreed with them, those who have held the position deserve a special place in our hearts and prayers for their service and commitment to Carroll County; for it is a wonder they are able to retire and not be committed: On any given day, the chief must keep the wheels of government running smoothly.

[…]

Often, my visits to the office of the chief of staff reminded me of the lyrics to the 1970 David Bowie song, "All the Madmen": "Day after day / They take some brain away / Then turn my face around / To the far side of town / And tell me that it's real / Then ask me how I feel." http://youtu.be/jb7Xdu7STx8 Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/carroll/westminster/ph-ce-eagle-archive-0504-20140505,0,6364637.story

[…]

Meanwhile, it is only fitting that Powell will be leaving to take a job in a retirement home — as vice president of finance for Carroll Lutheran Village. Join me in wishing him the best.



Powell joins distinguished club of former CC Chiefs of Staff by Kevin Dayhoff 5May2014 http://tinyurl.com/obrxrho



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Powell joins Grier and Bair in a distinguished club of former Carroll County chiefs of staff

Eagle Archives

By Kevin E. Dayhoff,

Sunday, May 4, 2014

The recent resignation of Steve Powell, the chief of staff for the Carroll County board of commissioners, brought back many memories of other distinguished individuals in Carroll County history who have endured that arduous position; Richard “Pat” Hill, Robert A. "Max" Bair and George A. Grier, to name a few.

In full disclosure this writer has had the honor and privilege to have worked with every Carroll County chief of staff – or ‘executive assistant’ - since the position was first created in 1959.

Being the ‘chief’ is an extremely difficult job - something akin to being pecked to death by a flock of friendly geese. And then, of course, there are those times when the geese were not so friendly. Whether you agreed or disagreed with the chief; everyone who has ever held that position deserves a special place in our hearts and prayers for their service and commitment to Carroll County.

That said, it is a wonder they retire and are not simply ‘committed.’ On any given day, the chief has to keep the wheels of government running smoothly.

This is a ‘mission impossible.’ It means keeping everyone happy including the commissioners, county department directors and bureau chiefs, county employees, and other elected officials from the delegation to Annapolis to any number of the eight county mayors and numerous council members. Then there are citizens, state and municipal bureaucrats, local nonprofits, churches and civic organizations.

Often my visits to the office of the chief of staff reminded me of the lyrics to the 1970 David Bowie song, “All the Madmen,” from the album, “The Man Who Sold the World.” “Day after day. They take some brain away. Then turn my face around. To the far side of town. And tell me that it's real. Then ask me how I feel…”

Consistently the individuals that have held the office have exemplified all that is the best of those who aspire to selfless public service.

Most recently the county commissioners announced the retirement of Powell in a press release on April 24. According to the release, “Powell has worked for the county for 28 years, most recently as Chief of Staff. He began working for Carroll County Government in October 1985 as Budget Officer. After 3 years in that role, he became the Director of Management and Budget and served in that capacity until becoming Chief of Staff in January 2003.” Powell followed in the footsteps of Hill, who had held the position for a couple of years after Bair retired on October 1, 2001.

Bair had worked for the county 31 years. According to an article in The Sun in September 2001 by Mary Gail Hare, Bair “started working for the county as a planner in 1970…” Bair was first appointed to the office of chief – executive assistant - in late 1983.

At that time, according to an article in The Sun on December 25, 1994 by Kerry O’Rourke, Bair “was named to replace George A. Grier as the commissioners' executive assistant. Mr. Grier had held the job for 25 years.” In a county government reorganization in December 1994, Bair was given the title of ‘chief of staff.’ Bair currently works as the Youth Program Coordinator for the Business and Employment Resource Center.

The first ‘chief of staff’ was Grier, who first joined county government in 1959, as the “first county administrator until his retirement in 1983. He likewise was the county's first planning director, developing the first county Master Plan and its zoning regulations. During this time, he served seven boards of county commissioners,” according to his published obituary after he passed away on Oct. 13, 2002.

Meanwhile, it is only fitting that Powell, according to an article in The Sun by Keith Meisel, will be leaving to take a job in a retirement home – as vice president of finance for Carroll Lutheran Village. Join me in wishing him the best.

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Other stories by Kevin E. Dayhoff:


Carroll County's connection to Cuba began with sugar in 1800s
Carroll County's connection to Cuba began with sugar in 1800s
KEVIN DAYHOFF
Powder, serving with the U.S. Army's 6th Cavalry, was waiting to be deployed to Cuba when he wrote to his sister, "Mrs. Wm. Stansbury," from Tampa, Florida: "Dear Sister. I and our troops are still here.
Underlining surveyors' contribution to Carroll County's history [Eagle Archives]
Underlining surveyors' contribution to Carroll County's history [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
For this year's event, which was scheduled for Jan. 17, the topic was the history of the county's northern border, the storied, celebrated and, at times, vilified Mason Dixon Line.
New year begins with familiar faces missing from county leadership [Column]
New year begins with familiar faces missing from county leadership [Column]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
On April 24, Carroll County's chief of staff, Steve Powell, retired from county government. He started worked for the county in October 1985 as a budget officer.
It's beginning to look a lot like . . . pickle ornaments? [Eagle Archives}
It's beginning to look a lot like . . . pickle ornaments? [Eagle Archives}
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
At the Carroll County Farm Museum holiday house tour and open house on Dec. 5, museum volunteer Michele Crew distributed glass pickles to the volunteers in attendance. I have a very vague recollection of hearing about a glass pickle Christmas tree ornament while growing-up in Carroll County.
A love story that began on New Year's Eve, 1945 [Eagle Archives]
A love story that began on New Year's Eve, 1945 [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
Much of the time, history can be the dry stuff of names and facts or memorized dates found in textbooks. Nothing can bring history alive more than our own memories or growing up listening to the recollections of our parents or grandparents.
Celebrating Grace Lutheran Church's growth and history in Westminster
Celebrating Grace Lutheran Church's growth and history in Westminster
KEVIN DAYHOFF
... church's commitment to Westminster — and was, in part, initiated by the husband and wife team of Pastors Martha and Kevin Clementson, who have led the congregation since December 2007. The rededication service on Sept. 14 will be officiated by ...
Pond a source of respite for Westminster visitors and residents
Pond a source of respite for Westminster visitors and residents
KEVIN DAYHOFF
More than 60 years ago, the Route 140 "Roadside Picnic Area and Community Fish Pond" was dedicated with great fanfare by then-Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin during a Saturday program that began at 2 p.m. and lasted all afternoon.
Westminster mayor remembered [Eagle Archives]
Westminster mayor remembered [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
Many historians would agree with state Sen. Joe Getty, a local historian, who wrote, "Researching local business histories is difficult and challenging. Sources for such information are generally scarce and incomplete?"
Assassinated McKinley ought to be remembered [Eagle Archives]
Assassinated McKinley ought to be remembered [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
He was shot twice before a Hispanic African-American, James Parker, stopped the shooting. McKinley died eight days later at 2:15 a.m. Sat., Sept. 14, 1901.
Stunning results and negative attacks in November [Eagle Archives]
Stunning results and negative attacks in November [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
On Nov. 10, the headline on a prominent local newspaper read, "A Splendid Victory for the Right!" for an article that analyzed the results from the recent election results. Several weeks have gone by and folks are still talking about the Nov.
Consider chilled treat as weather begins to cool [Eagle Archives]
Consider chilled treat as weather begins to cool [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
Much of the discussion about the 250th anniversary of the City of Westminster has emphasized the early establishment of the retail stores, restaurants and hotels in town that provided goods and services for the steady stream of settlers who were traveling west.
Honoring a legacy of service to community and country [Eagle Archives]
Honoring a legacy of service to community and country [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
It was an eerie juxtaposition in Westminster on the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Participants were making their final preparations for marching in the annual Westminster Christmas parade ? "Miracle on Main Street.
Nov. 15 5k honors memory of Terry Burk and Sam Case [Eagle Archives]
Nov. 15 5k honors memory of Terry Burk and Sam Case [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
Since 2003, the event, which is sponsored by the Westminster Road Runners Club, has been held in honor of the memory of Terry Burk, who was struck by a car and killed on Aug. 10, 1995, while jogging with his friends, Dave Roush, Don Myers, and Dave Herlocker, on Route 97 at Kalten Road.
Life of country doctor part of late morning repast after church service [Eagle Archives]
Life of country doctor part of late morning repast after church service [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
While enjoying a pot-luck lunch served at the Taylorsville United Methodist Church after a Sept. 14 Homecoming service, the subject of the life and times and history of Dr. J. Francis Crawford came up during a conversation with Bill Knill and the church's historian, Steve Bittner, Jr.
An honor for an advocate from hospital's past as its future takes new direction
An honor for an advocate from hospital's past as its future takes new direction
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
It was an ironic twist of fate. On Oct. 22, it was announced that Dr. C. Levine Billingslea, one of the earliest proponents of Carroll Hospital Center, would be posthumously awarded the Legacy Award by the Community Foundation of Carroll County. Then, on Nov.



Volunteer fire companies truly a valued asset in the county
Volunteer fire companies truly a valued asset in the county
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
The first mention of a fire department in what we now know as Carroll County was in 1808 when the Maryland General Assembly "passed an act authorizing the raising of money by lottery to pay for a fire engine?"
Fire department dinner meeting an annual tradition in Westminster [Eagle Archives]
Fire department dinner meeting an annual tradition in Westminster [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN E. DAYHOFF
The annual event is a time-honored tradition that goes back to the beginning of the current fire company in Westminster, which was incorporated on Jan. 29, 1879, in the midst of enormous contention after a series of disastrous fires between 1857 and 1879, when there was no fire company in town.
Carroll County's connection to Greece [Eagle Archives]
Carroll County's connection to Greece [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN. E. DAYHOFF
Several weeks ago, Westminster was the focal point of a distinguished assembly of Greek families as folks from all over the country came to town to celebrate the life of Zoe Amprazis Sirinakis, 85, who died on Dec. 29.
Sergeant major's appointment brings attention of Annapolis to Carroll County
Sergeant major's appointment brings attention of Annapolis to Carroll County
KEVIN. E. DAYHOFF
On Jan. 21, the adjutant general of Maryland, Brig. Gen. Linda Singh, announced that she had appointed Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas Beyard, of Westminster, to be the senior enlisted leader of the Maryland National Guard, its top enlisted position.
Carroll County's new leaders share more than priority of public safety [Eagle Archives]
Carroll County's new leaders share more than priority of public safety [Eagle Archives]
KEVIN. E. DAYHOFF
Just days after the sheriff's office made that announcement, the office announced the appointment of an additional investigator to the county's drug task force to address the community's growing alarm regarding the abuse of prescription drugs and heroin.


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See also - Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art www.kevindayhoff.com: Travel, art, artists, authors, books, newspapers, media, writers and writing, journalists and journalism, reporters and reporting, music, culture, opera... Ad maiorem Dei gloriam inque hominum salutem. “Deadline U.S.A.” 1952. Ed Hutcheson: “That's the press, baby. The press! And there's nothing you can do about it. Nothing!” - See more at: http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/#sthash.4HNLwtfd.dpuf
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