Journalist @baltimoresun writer artist runner #amwriting Chaplain PIO #partylikeajournalist

Journalist @baltimoresun writer artist runner #amwriting Chaplain PIO #partylikeajournalist
Journalist @baltimoresun writer artist runner #amwriting Md Troopers Assoc #20 & Westminster Md Fire Dept Chaplain PIO #partylikeajournalist

Tuesday, November 09, 1999

19991108 Superbowl Sunday

Superbowl Sunday

I got this in an e-mail and I can’t help myself. I simply must post it… Please enjoy.

Superbowl Sunday

November 8th, 1999

A guy named Joe received a free ticket to the SuperBowl from his company. Unfortunately, when Joe arrived at the stadium, he realized that his seat is in the last row, in the corner of the stadium. He's closer to the Goodyear Blimp than the field.

About halfway through the first quarter, Joe sees through his binoculars an empty seat, 10 rows off the field, right on the 50 yardline.

He decides to take a chance and makes his way through the stadium and around the security guards to the empty seat.

As he sits down, Joe asks the gentleman sitting next to him, "Excuse me, is anyone sitting here?"

The man says "No."

Now, very excited to be in such a great seat for the game, Joe again inquires of the man next to him, "This is incredible! Who in their right mind would have a seat like this at the SuperBowl and not use it?!"

The man replies, "Well, actually, the seat belongs to me. I was supposed to come with my wife, but she passed away. This is the first SuperBowl we haven't been together at since we got married in 1967."

"Well, that's really sad," said Joe, "but still, you couldn't find anyone to take the seat? A friend or close relative?"

"No," the man replies, "They're all at the funeral."

####

Monday, October 25, 1999

19991025 City Space Study Minutes

CITY OF WESTMINSTER, MARYLAND
CITY SPACE STUDY COMMITTEE

MINUTES
OCTOBER 25, 1999

A meeting of the City Space Study Committee of the Westminster City Council was held in the office of Finance Director Steve Dutterer on Monday, October 25, 1999 at 11:00 a.m.

Present were Committee Members: Public Works Director Thomas B. Beyard, Finance Director Steve Dutterer, City Attorney John B. Walsh, Jr. and Chairman Councilman Kevin Dayhoff. Absent was Councilman Greg Pecoraro.

1. The Mission Statement of the City Space Study Committee was discussed.
That discussion included:

The purpose of the City Space Study Committee is to establish what will be the future administrative office needs of the City of Westminster.

In the new millennium, Westminster, like most municipalities, will increasingly be in the customer service business. Westminster will be forming partnerships and collaborations with the business community and our citizenry. As more Federal and State programs and mandates are being placed at the local level of government, we will need to maximize the most efficient governmental response to these expanding roles and complexities of government.

After projections about our future needs are established, we will formulate an approach as to how we can best meet those projected administrative office needs. Since the City has perpetual existence, it does not appear to make good fiscal sense to rent rather than own a facility.

We believe that it is in the City's best interests and that the public will be best served by the re-centralization of City's administrative services in one administrative office facility located in such a manner that it will further expanding upon the 'City Campus approach'

2. Identification of past considerations and deliberations upon City space study needs. There was some discussion about the City Hall Space Planning and Feasibility Study executed by Cho, Wilks and Benn Architects in May of 1991. Mr. Dayhoff questioned how the determination was made to not implement the centralization as recommended by the study. The Committee lamented the cost of duplication of support functions and lack of expandability that has resulted because the recommended centralization was not executed.

3. The Committee discussed an analysis of the present situation. The Committee asked the Department Heads to develop and divide current and future square footage and staffing needs for 1 year, 5 year, and 10 year increments. In that regard, the following was discussed.

a. Staffing Projections
b. Present square footage requirements
c. Future square footage requirements
d. Identified the need to establish our present cost per square foot
e. Future square footage demands for Council Chambers

4. The Committee felt the need to identify potential sites for future City space needs.

a. The old J.C. Penny Building
1. The status of and the potential for more space from the old J. C. Penny building
2. There was some discussion on perhaps the feasibility of purchasing the old J.C. Penny building.
b. EZ Letter Quick Stick property next to the existing Police Department at 36 Locust Street
c. The Leister property to the rear of City Hall
d. The old Post Office at 83 E. Main Street
e. The Farmer's Supply Site at Liberty and Green Streets.
f. The old Farmer's Fertilizer & Feed Property on Railroad Avenue more recently referred to as the Southern States property.
g. Expand City Hall
h. The Key Lot

5. The Committee discussed the capital requirements of the City's future space needs with respect to the possibility of building a parking garage on the Longwell Parking lot and the expansion of the existing police station.

6. There was some discussion about centralizing all of the space needs for the City's administrative offices and if that direction were chosen, what would be the disposition of City Hall if we were to move the offices out of City Hall. The conversation digressed to the last time the City Administrative offices were moved from the old Fire Hall to the Longwell Mansion in the late 1930's.

7. There was some discussion about what sort of administrative organization might be desired in the future for the City's offices. There was some discussion about centralized, reintegration of staff and offices and maintaining an integrated, contiguous campus from the City's Street Department to the Police Department to City Hall to the Armory Building. At that point discussion followed regarding whether or not the old Post Office would fit in to that central office scheme or whether it would be better to build on the Key Lot or the Leister property.

The Committee indicated its intention to meet on
Monday, January 24, 2000 at 11 A.M. in the office of Finance Director Steve Dutterer to continue its discussions.

The Committee adjourned its meeting at 12:00 p.m.


_____________________
Kevin E. Dayhoff, Chair

Tuesday, October 12, 1999

19991012 City aims to clean up Pa Ave By Kevin Griffis Carroll County Times Staff Writer

First published Tuesday, October 12, 1999

City aims to clean up Pa. Avenue

Westminster fines landlord; actions against drug trade to continue

By KEVIN GRIFFIS Carroll County Times Staff Writer

The city of Westminster fined a Pennsylvania Avenue landlord $2,000 Monday for failing to vacate and secure his property - a move Mayor Kenneth A. Yowan described as ``just the beginning'' to force landlords to evict known drug sellers.

Yowan said the city will also look to notify the mortgage companies that hold the properties' mortgages and file civil suits against landlords who fail to do anything about tenants who are known drug suppliers.

The city has continued to apply police pressure to the area, instituting foot patrols, and, on Thursday, raiding a 73 Pennsylvania Ave. apartment that Westminster Police Chief Roger Joneckis said was a hangout for crack cocaine users and sellers.

Joneckis said his department has more initiatives planned for the area but could not yet elaborate.

But the city and the police force can only do so much to control the drug problem and crime along Pennsylvania Avenue, Yowan said at Monday night's City Council meeting. The city needs the cooperation of neighborhood landlords.

``Unfortunately, we have run into problems with five or six landlords, whose properties harbor persons involved in repeated drug activities but who don't seem to want to cooperate with the city and other property owners,'' Yowan said, reading from a prepared statement.

``Rather, they just want to sit back, collect their money and turn a blind eye to problems with their properties.''

The owner of 22-24 Pennsylvania Ave. is the first landlord to draw a fine from the city in its push to improve the neighborhood.

Yowan suggested the man's inaction, and similar responses the city has received from other landlords, was not fair to the neighborhood or to the city's taxpayers.

``It is time for them to seriously consider being part of the solution instead of part of the problem, and the sooner the better for them,'' Yowan said.

The landlord, Robert Foster, could not be reached for comment Monday night.

Yowan also announced the date of a clean-up of Pennsylvania Avenue.

The scheduled date is Oct. 30, and the city's public works personnel and equipment will be out to work on the road and its alleyways with neighbors, he said. People who want to participate are asked to meet at 8 a.m. at Vince's Seafood, at the corner of West Main Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, to organize, Yowan said.

Joneckis said his department has been in contact with area businesses and plans to ask Western Maryland College fraternities and sororities to aid in the clean-up.

In other business Monday night:

The City Council designated Sunday, Oct. 31, from dusk until 8 p.m., as the night for children to go trick-or-treating in the city.

The council asks that children wear light-colored clothing and only go to homes with a porch light on.

Wednesday, October 06, 1999

19991005 Halloween Trick or Treating memo for October 31, 1999

Westminster Maryland Halloween Trick or Treating

MEMORANDUM - October 5, 1999

TO: City Council Members

SUBJECT: HALLOWEEN TRICK OR TREATING

Halloween Trick or Treating should be conducted the evening of Sunday, October 31,1999 between the hours of dusk and 8 PM and is restricted to children age 12 and under plus accompanying parents or adult guardians. Residents who wish to participate by providing treats to the children should turn on their outside light. Children are advised to wear some light colored clothing so as to be more visible to motorists and to go to homes in their immediate neighborhoods with lights. Motorists should pay particular care on the evening of October 31st with so many children walking around City streets.

KENNETH A. YOWAN

Mayor

cc: John Dudderar

Chief Roger Joneckis

Thursday, September 02, 1999

19990901 Maryland Municipal League (MML) Synopsis by Kevin Dayhoff

Maryland Municipal League (MML) Synopsis

By Kevin Dayhoff

Wednesday, September 01, 1999

The Maryland Municipal League, founded in 1936, works as a advocate for municipalities throughout the State of Maryland, strengthening the role and capacity of municipal government through research, legislation, technical assistance, training and the dissemination of information for its members.

MML is a statewide organization in Maryland composed solely of municipal officials.

The Maryland Municipal League represents 154 municipal governments and 2 special taxing districts throughout the state of Maryland. The MML is a voluntary, nonprofit, nonpartisan association controlled and maintained by city and town governments.

Wednesday, September 01, 1999 / ked

May 30, 2005 UPDATE

Disclosure: I served on the Maryland Municipal League Board of Directors annually for five consecutive years, from June 2000 to May 2005.

I graduated from the University of Maryland Academy for Excellence in Local Government in June 2001.

I served on the Maryland Municipal League’s Legislative Committee in 1999-2000 and 2001-2002.

I served as Secretary/Treasurer of the Carroll County Chapter of the Maryland Municipal League for five years (12/07/1999 – 05/16/2005).

I was first elected to the Westminster City Council in May of 1999 and served as the Mayor of Westminster from May 2001 until May 16th, 2005.]


Wednesday, September 01, 1999

19990901 Cuban Ambassador Vicki Huddleston State Department Bio

Cuban Ambassador Vicki Huddleston State Department Bio



September 1999



Biography



Vicki Huddleston


Principal Officer, USINT, Havana, Cuba


http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/cuba/huddleston_vicki.html


In September 1999, Ambassador Vicki Huddleston, a career Foreign Service Officer, became Principal Officer at the United States Interests Section (USINT), Havana, Cuba. Over the past two years, she has been Deputy Assistant Secretary for African Affairs with responsibility for West and Francophone Central Africa. She was United States Ambassador to the Republic of Madagascar from 1995-1997.


Ambassador Huddleston was Deputy Chief of Mission in Port-au-Prince from 1993-1995 during the deployment of the Multinational Force to Haiti. She was Deputy and then Coordinator of the State Department's Office of Cuban Affairs from 1989-1993.


Earlier in her career, she was chief of the Economic Sections in Sierra Leone and in Mali. She has worked in the Bureau of International Organization Affairs, the Office of Mexican Affairs, and as Country Desk Officer for Bolivia. In 1988-1989, while working for Senator Jeff Bingaman of New Mexico as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow, she drafted the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) legislation which became law in 1990. Prior to entering the Foreign Service, she worked in Peru and Brazil for the American Institute for Free Labor Development. As a Peace Corps Volunteer in Peru, she organized the financing for the two housing cooperatives in Arequipa.


Ambassador Huddleston has received four Superior Honor Awards and two Meritorious Honor Awards. In 1994-1995, she shared with members of the U.S. Embassy in Haiti the Distinguished Service Award and the Award for Valor. Her husband Robert is a retired Foreign Service Officer. Arizona is her home state.


Cuba

####

Friday, August 27, 1999

19990827 City Space Study Com Original memo

MEMORANDUM

TO: Mayor Kenneth A. Yowan

FROM: Council Member Kevin E. Dayhoff

DATE: August 27, 1999

RE: Space Study Committee

At its last meeting, The Mayor and Common Council agreed to an extension of the City's lease of space at Winchester West, located at 56 West Main Street. As you know, for the past five years, the City has rented space at that location for its Finance and Housing offices. The current five-year lease expires on February 28, 2000, and the extension which was approved at the last meeting, extends that period for an additional five years.

Due to time constraints and other operational issues, I fully concurred with the recent action in approving the extension of the lease. However, it is my recommendation that a Space Study Committee be established promptly to look at the issue of the City's space needs in the near and distant future. I make that recommendation for three reasons:

1. Since the City has perpetual existence, it does not appear to me to make good fiscal sense to rent rather than own a facility;

2. Even a cursory view of the current space occupied by Finance and Housing indicates that it is used almost to its maximum. There is very little room for expansion; and

3. There are other sites which may be more suited for the City's needs over the long haul.

In that regard, I believe that the City has a wide range of possible options with respect to its future space needs. Those options include the possibility of building above City Hall where the City currently owns land, the use of the Southern States property or the Farmers Supply property, or the purchase of an existing facility.

This memorandum will advise you that I am willing to chair such a committee or serve as a member. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you wish to discuss this matter further.

CC: All Council Members
Thomas B. Beyard, Director of Planning and Public Works
Stephen V. Dutterer, Director of Finance
John B. Walsh, Jr.

Thursday, August 05, 1999

19990801 Carroll County Maryland Election Districts

Carroll County Election Districts

August 1, 1999

01-0 Taneytown Election District
01-1 City of Taneytown
02-0 Uniontown Election District – Mayberry
03-0 Myers Election District - Silver Run, Union Mills
04-0 Woolery’s Election District - Finksburg, Gamber, Patapsco
05-0 Freedom Election District – Eldersburg
05-1 Town of Sykesville
06-0 Manchester Election District
06-1 Town of Manchester
07-0 Westminster Election District
07-1 City of Westminster
08-0 Hampstead Election District
08-1 Town of Hampstead
09-0 Franklin Election District - Taylorsville, Winfield
10-0 Middleburg Election District - Middleburg, Keymar
11-0 New Windsor Election District
11-1 Town of New Windsor
12-0 Union Bridge Election District
12-1 Town of Union Bridge
13-0 Mount Airy Election District
13-1 Town of Mount Airy
14-0 Berrett Election District - Woodbine

Monday, August 02, 1999

19990801 List of Carroll County Maryland Election Districts

Carroll County, Maryland Election Districts

August 1, 1999

01-0 Taneytown Election District

01-1 City of Taneytown

02-0 Uniontown Election District – Mayberry

03-0 Myers Election District - Silver Run, Union Mills

04-0 Woolery’s Election District - Finksburg, Gamber, Patapsco

05-0 Freedom Election District – Eldersburg

05-1 Town of Sykesville

06-0 Manchester Election District

06-1 Town of Manchester

07-0 Westminster Election District

07-1 City of Westminster

08-0 Hampstead Election District

08-1 Town of Hampstead

09-0 Franklin Election District - Taylorsville, Winfield

10-0 Middleburg Election District - Middleburg, Keymar

11-0 New Windsor Election District

11-1 Town of New Windsor

12-0 Union Bridge Election District

12-1 Town of Union Bridge

13-0 Mount Airy Election District

13-1 Town of Mount Airy

14-0 Berrett Election District - Woodbine

19990801 List of Carroll County Maryland Election Districts

Tuesday, July 20, 1999

19990720 Electric Deregulation Workshop Synopsis

"Electric De-regulation and Energy Performance Contracting for Local Governments"

07/20/1999: I attended an all day Regional Energy Workshop on "Electric De-regulation and Energy Performance Contracting for Local Governments" at Howard Community College.

There were three components to the workshop:

1. Electric De-regulation: An introduction to the new regulations being implemented in Maryland to let customers to choose their own energy provider. This session provided training for local governments on how implement aggregation, pooling and bulk purchasing programs. Presentations were made on proposed programs that specifically assist local governments in their energy provider selection.

2. Energy Performance Contracting: This session included an overview of a new program being offered by the Maryland Energy Administration to local governments, which assists in implementing projects that improve energy efficiency and reduce consumption.

3. Maryland Grant and Alternate Financing Opportunities: The MEA is offering a series of grants to local governments that provide planning phase assistance to implement an Energy Performance Contracting program. This session also presented information on alternative financing programs offered by the Maryland State Central fund and municipal bonds.

Kevin E. Dayhoff

Westminster City Council

P.O. Box 1245

Westminster, MD 21158-0124

Monday, June 14, 1999

19990614 The Kennedys by Hugh Sidey Time magazine

June 14, 1999

Hugh Sidey, who “has reported on and written about nine U.S. presidencies for TIME” has penned a short and concise piece of why the Kennedy family continues to be relevant in American history – no matter what your political persuasion.

Time magazine Monday, June 14, 1999 Heroes and Icons by Hugh Sidey Monday, June 14, 1999

With its mix of political triumph and human tragedy, their saga enthralled the nation and made them America's most powerful family

The Kennedy clan, the pre-eminent American political family of our time, seems to be cast in the stars, the distant stuff of legend.

But look down. They march ever more numerous among us. There's a spot on Washington's infamous Beltway where an unsuspecting family might find their children in school with a couple of Joseph and Rose Kennedy's 54 great-grandchildren.

That same family could be the neighbors of Eunice Kennedy Shriver, one of the Kennedy clan's five surviving originals (there were nine). It could be served in the Maryland assembly by delegate Mark Shriver, nephew of the martyred John Kennedy (and one of 29 grandchildren of Joe and Rose). And it could fall under the growing political hand of Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, oldest child of the murdered Robert Kennedy, now Maryland's lieutenant governor and touted for higher office.

Members of such a Beltway family would have as good a chance as not to pass Ethel Kennedy, Bobby's widow and still the exuberant duchess of Hickory Hill, while driving to work along the Potomac River parkways.

[…]

The Kennedy clan is embedded in American political culture of the past half-century like no other family. They arrived at that power base through cold calculation and the blunt instrument of their immense wealth but also because of honorable service to the nation, their reckless exuberance and glamour--and family tragedy beyond measure.

[…]

Read the entire article here: The Kennedys

Related:

Dubious Influences: Century's Villains and Antiheroes

Five Captivating Romances: When Love Was the Adventure

####

Label: President John F. Kennedy – see also Kennedy Family

19990614 The Kennedys by Hugh Sidey Time magazine

June 14, 1999

Hugh Sidey, who “has reported on and written about nine U.S. presidencies for TIME” has penned a short and concise piece of why the Kennedy family continues to be relevant in American history – no matter what your political persuasion.

Time magazine Monday, June 14, 1999 Heroes and Icons by Hugh Sidey Monday, June 14, 1999

With its mix of political triumph and human tragedy, their saga enthralled the nation and made them America's most powerful family

The Kennedy clan, the pre-eminent American political family of our time, seems to be cast in the stars, the distant stuff of legend.

But look down. They march ever more numerous among us. There's a spot on Washington's infamous Beltway where an unsuspecting family might find their children in school with a couple of Joseph and Rose Kennedy's 54 great-grandchildren.

That same family could be the neighbors of Eunice Kennedy Shriver, one of the Kennedy clan's five surviving originals (there were nine). It could be served in the Maryland assembly by delegate Mark Shriver, nephew of the martyred John Kennedy (and one of 29 grandchildren of Joe and Rose). And it could fall under the growing political hand of Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, oldest child of the murdered Robert Kennedy, now Maryland's lieutenant governor and touted for higher office.

Members of such a Beltway family would have as good a chance as not to pass Ethel Kennedy, Bobby's widow and still the exuberant duchess of Hickory Hill, while driving to work along the Potomac River parkways.

[…]

The Kennedy clan is embedded in American political culture of the past half-century like no other family. They arrived at that power base through cold calculation and the blunt instrument of their immense wealth but also because of honorable service to the nation, their reckless exuberance and glamour--and family tragedy beyond measure.

[…]

Read the entire article here: The Kennedys

Related:

Dubious Influences: Century's Villains and Antiheroes

Five Captivating Romances: When Love Was the Adventure

####

Label: President John F. Kennedy – see also Kennedy Family

Thursday, May 20, 1999

19990519 Skateboard Park by Kevin Griffis, Carroll County Times Staff Writer

19990519 Skateboard Park by Kevin Griffis, Carroll County Times Staff Writer

First published in the
Carroll County Times Wednesday, May 19, 1999

Skateboard park rolling strong

By KEVIN GRIFFIS,
Carroll County Times Staff Writer

By all accounts, Westminster's new skate park has been an overwhelming success, but city officials say they aren't surprised with the demand for the facility.

Skaters are roundly happy with the park, but many want to see its street course expanded.

``The skate park has been received extremely well; we're overly pleased,'' said Ronald J. Schroers, supervisor of Westminster's recreation office.

The park has already sold 40 season passes, good April through October, at $40 a pop and there's been no shortage of daily users who have to pay for a $5 one-day pass, Schroers said.

Westminster Mayor Kenneth A. Yowan joked that the city should franchise the parks.

``Every time I talked with a group of youngsters, whether it was a scout group, a church group or whatever, the subject of a skate park seemed to come up,'' Yowan said.

``Skateboarding is popular and it's not going away. Now youngsters have a place to go and skate without being hassled, a place where they also have to wear the proper safety attire.''

But don't expect to see the 56-year-old mayor on the halfpipe anytime soon.

``I tried it once, 10 or 20 years ago, for about five seconds, and managed somehow to get off without breaking my neck,'' Yowan joked.

Although it's only been open since Friday, some of the problems people predicted the park would have - fights and skaters using loud, abusive language - have not materialized, and Schroers said he doesn't think they will. Even though the skaters often have to wait quite a
while for their turn on the equipment, Schroers said there appears to be an understanding among the park's users.

``There's such camaraderie out there,'' he said. ``These kids have a code of ethics. Yes, they all have to wait, but they're working this thing together.''

Westminster Police Capt. Randy Barnes confirmed Schroers assessment. He said the department has been making patrol checks on the facility and no problems have been reported.

Westminster police headquarters is located less than a block away from the park, on Locust Street.

Early Tuesday afternoon there were already 10 skaters riding the park's halfpipe and small street course. The street course is made up of two mini-ramps and a short, flat obstacle skaters can jump and grind the bottom side of their boards on.

Jesse Peltzer, 17, was one of the best on the course. On one of the two small ramps, he could flip the skateboard underneath him while he turned in the air and find the board with his feet to stop the spin and ride back down the ramp in the opposite direction.

``Yeah, it's pretty rad,'' Peltzer said about the skate park.

It gets a little crowded at times with ``little kids'' just learning how to skate, Peltzer said, but on Tuesday everyone waited politely for their turn.

Michael Cassell, 15, who arrived at the park with Peltzer, said he believes one of the ideas of the people who built the park was to keep people from skating on the streets, but there really isn't enough equipment on the street course to keep everyone off the streets.

To that end, Schroers said there is room at the park to add some equipment, and the street department can make up some ``commercial grade'' obstacles, like grindrails, for the kids to use.

If the interest warrants it, the park can also expand its fenced-in borders, he said.

Yowan said that probably won't happen this year, but the city will monitor activity at the park and, as with any recreational area, decide if the facility should be expanded.

Schroers said the fees have offset the cost of keeping a monitor at the park and said he's already improved the park to keep up with requests from skaters. He added a portable toilet, and on Tuesday he said he was going to have a soda machine installed.

Schroers also issues free passes to parents when their children buy a season ticket.

``I want to keep the parents involved so they can help monitor the park,'' Schroers said.

Right now, he has staffed the skate park with a full-time attendant, but he said during the summer, the facility will be staffed part-time and the attendant will split his time between the city playground and the skate park.

There have been a few injuries, Schroers said, but nothing much different than can be found at any other city recreational facility.

The park is insured by the city's insurance company, LEGIT.


Westminster Dept Recreation and Parks, Westminster Recreation and Parks Skateboard Park, People Natl Internatl Griffis – Kevin Griffis, Media journalists Griffis – see People Natl Internatl Griffis – Kevin Griffis

Wednesday, May 12, 1999

Walking Running or riding a bicycle

Monday, May 10, 1999

19990510 City of Westminster Statement Or Return Of Election

19990510 City of Westminster Statement Or Return Of Election with notes

City of Westminster Statement Or Return Of Election

May 10th, 1999

The following "Statement or Return of Election" was presented by Chief Election Judge, Nancy A. Smelser:

"STATEMENT OR RETURN OF ELECTION

To The Mayor and Common Council of Westminster:

We the undersigned Judges and Clerk of the Biennial Municipal Election, held in the City of Westminster, Maryland, on Monday, May 10, 1999, (between the hours of 7 o'clock A.M. and 7 o'clock P.M.) for the election of three Common Council Members to serve as members of the Common Council for the City of Westminster for four years commencing on the Third Monday of May, 1999, do hereby certify that the polls were opened at 7 A.M. and closed at 7 P.M. on this 10th day of May, 1999, and that at said election the whole number of votes cast was 456 and of that number those cast for the candidates for the respective offices was and is as follows:

FOR COUNCIL MEMBERS NUMBER OF VOTES

Suzanne P. Albert 284 or 62% of the vote

Kevin Dayhoff 348 or 76% of the vote

Gregory Pecoraro 286 or 63% of the vote

Frank Wagner 242 or 53% of the vote

And it appearing that Suzanne P. Albert, Kevin Dayhoff and Gregory Pecoraro for Common Council received a majority of the votes cast, we the undersigned Judges and Clerk of the election, do hereby certify and proclaim that the aforenamed persons were duly and fairly elected to their respective offices for four years.

And it further appearing that Suzanne P. Albert, Kevin Dayhoff and Gregory Pecoraro were the three candidates who received the highest number of votes cast for Common Council we do hereby declare that they will hold office for the four years.

And we do further certify that the above statement is correct in all and every respect, and that notice has been given to the candidates of their election.

Witness our hands this 10th day of May, 1999
s/ Nancy A. Smelser
s/ Fred L. Plunkert
Chief Judges

19990510 City of Westminster Statement Or Return Of Election

City of Westminster Statement Or Return Of Election

May 10th, 1999

The following "Statement or Return of Election" was presented by Chief Election Judge, Nancy A. Smelser:

"STATEMENT OR RETURN OF ELECTION

To The Mayor and Common Council of Westminster:

We the undersigned Judges and Clerk of the Biennial Municipal Election, held in the City of Westminster, Maryland, on Monday, May 10, 1999, (between the hours of 7 o'clock A.M. and 7 o'clock P.M.) for the election of three Common Council Members to serve as members of the Common Council for the City of Westminster for four years commencing on the Third Monday of May, 1999, do hereby certify that the polls were opened at 7 A.M. and closed at 7 P.M. on this 10th day of May, 1999, and that at said election the whole number of votes cast was 456 and of that number those cast for the candidates for the respective offices was and is as follows:

FOR COUNCIL MEMBERS NUMBER OF VOTES

Suzanne P. Albert 284 or 62% of the vote

Kevin Dayhoff 348 or 76% of the vote

Gregory Pecoraro 286 or 63% of the vote

Frank Wagner 242 or 53% of the vote

And it appearing that Suzanne P. Albert, Kevin Dayhoff and Gregory Pecoraro for Common Council received a majority of the votes cast, we the undersigned Judges and Clerk of the election, do hereby certify and proclaim that the aforenamed persons were duly and fairly elected to their respective offices for four years.

And it further appearing that Suzanne P. Albert, Kevin Dayhoff and Gregory Pecoraro were the three candidates who received the highest number of votes cast for Common Council we do hereby declare that they will hold office for the four years.

And we do further certify that the above statement is correct in all and every respect, and that notice has been given to the candidates of their election.

Witness our hands this 10th day of May, 1999

s/ Nancy A. Smelser

s/ Fred L. Plunkert

Chief Judges"

Wednesday, April 14, 1999

19990413 More candidates file for May elections By KEVIN GRIFFIS, Times Staff Writer

19990413 More candidates file for May elections By KEVIN GRIFFIS, Times Staff Writer

http://www.carrollcounty.com/news/tue3.htm

First published in the
Carroll County Times Tuesday, April 13, 1999

More candidates file for May elections

Chapin won't seek re-election in Westminster

By KEVIN GRIFFIS, Times Staff Writer

There were only a few last-second filings Monday for Carroll's May municipal elections.

Most of the action took place in Hampstead and Taneytown, while in Westminster a city councilman who had waffled about whether he would run again decided to forgo another race.

In a town that has what could become the most interesting mayoral race this year, county political newcomers Keith A. Heindel and Denise Justus both filed to run for Hampstead city council seats the last day they could, said town clerk Pat Warner.

That brings the total candidates for the two open seats to five. Incumbents Lawrence H. Hentz Jr. and Stephen A. Holland and challenger Steven Balaz have also declared for the race. Balaz ran and lost in 1997.

Mayor Chris Nevin filed for re-election April 8, Warner said. He will battle councilman Wayne H. Thomas for Hampstead's top spot.

Nevin ousted incumbent C. Clinton Becker by running on a slow-growth platform in 1995. The mayor, though, has taken heat recently for approving a 66-condominium development in the Roberts Field housing development.

Thomas has served on the city council since 1991 and was re-elected in 1997.

In Taneytown, Henry C. Heine Jr. is running unopposed for mayor, while at the last moment Bobby Wales joined Daryl Hale and incumbent Brian Long in the race for two city council seats.

Westminster incumbent councilman Stephen R. Chapin had said he would play it down to the wire before making a decision on whether or not he would run for re-election. He said he was waiting to find out whether another fiscal conservative would file. That didn't happen, but Chapin still decided not to run again.

Chapin said he's become an advocate for term limits. It's time for some new blood, he said. Chapin, a self-described fiscal conservative and eight-year council veteran, said he hopes someone else steps forward on the council to watch the town's pennies.

There are only four candidates running for three open seats in Westminster.

In 1995, five people ran for three council seats and the city experienced the lowest election-day turnout of any municipality in the county.

City officials attributed the low turnout and dearth of election day choices in 1995 to a lack of hot-button issues and have said the same about this year's race.

Incumbents Suzanne Albert and Gregory Pecoraro are running with challengers Kevin Dayhoff and Frank Wagner.

New Windsor has three open seats and five candidates have filed to run. Councilmen Paul Garvey, Ronnie Blacksten and Terry Petry are running against last-minute filers Samuel Pierce and Kevin Null.

Potential candidates in Union Bridge, a town that passed a water rate hike in January, have until 4 p.m. today to declare their candidacy. As of Monday afternoon, only incumbents Mayor Perry L. Jones Jr. and Councilmen Bret D. Grossnickle and Donald Wilson had filed.

At the Sykesville Town Council meeting held Monday night, town council members William R. Hall, Michael Kasnia, Jeannie Nichols and Michael H. Burgoyne announced they will seek re-election. They will, however, by challenged by five other candidates. Three full-term seats [four years] and one partial-term seat [two-years] will be up for grabs. Each candidate must have been nominated in person at the meeting in order to be declared as an offical candidate.

The other candiates nominated are Charles B. Mullins, Scott Hollenbeck, Constance Lee Higgins, Cynthia DeBari Campbell and Garth Adams.

Wednesday, April 07, 1999

Environmental Affairs Advisory Board Rediscovered on the County Staff DisOrganized ReOrganizational Chart

Environmental Affairs Advisory Board Rediscovered on the County Staff DisOrganized ReOrganizational Chart

April 9, 1999

Today, it was disclosed exactly where the Environmental Affairs Advisory Board would soon be restored to the County Staff disorganized reorganizational chart.

…..Attendance of all County Staff was mandatory at a ceremony at the fountain in front of the County Office Building as high Carroll County Government officials announced stringent new regulations developed to stem the alarming rise of environmental activism in the community. One official was overheard to say: "Environmentalists get emotional and that leads to overkill in the regulation department."

Meanwhile, at a secret, undisclosed location……………………………………
19990407-1082-cropped-So-mu.gif

Kevin Dayhoff Soundtrack: http://www.kevindayhoff.net/ Kevin Dayhoff Art: http://www.kevindayhoffart.com/ Kevin Dayhoff Westminster: http://www.westgov.net/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/kevindayhoff Twitpic: http://twitpic.com/photos/kevindayhoff
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/kevindayhoff Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1040426835

Monday, March 29, 1999

19990328 Baltimore Sun: Home rehabilitation loans offered to low-income Westminster residents By Kristine Henry

19990328 Baltimore Sun: Home rehabilitation loans offered to low-income Westminster residents By Kristine Henry

Home rehabilitation loans offered to low-income Westminster residents

Originally published on Mar 28 1999 by the Baltimore Sun. Article written by Kristine Henry, Baltimore Sun Staff

As Westminster prepares to beef up its housing-code enforcement, the city has begun administering a loan program to help low-income residents fix up their homes.

The Maryland Housing Rehabilitation Program is also administered by the county, but city officials wanted a stronger emphasis on the program. The city recently hired a full-time coordinator to handle the loans for Westminster residents.

"We have a lot of housing stock that's very old and it's tired. It's owned by people on fixed incomes and there are things they'd like to do but they can't afford it, but they don't want to move," said Ray Fleming, the city's rehabilitation coordinator at the Office of Housing and Community Development, which is running the program.

"If a 75-year-old woman is living on Social Security, she can't put a roof on the house herself and she does not have the money to hire someone to do it, so it gets deferred," he said.

The loan program is aimed at people whose income is too low to make them eligible for commercial loans, or people who have spotty credit histories, Fleming said.

"The idea is to finance major rehabilitation projects. You might be talking about things like bringing the house up to code, new roofs, new siding, replacing windows or weatherproofing. Things that improve the livability of a house, not just cosmetic things."

The interest rate varies between 4.5 percent and 7 percent with 20 to 30-year terms. To qualify, a single person must have an annual income of less than $36,000; a two-person household's income can't exceed $41,150.

"If their income is very low, they may qualify for a deferred loan," Fleming said. "They would have no payments due until the property is sold. If they borrowed $4,000 for a roof, we would put a $4,000 lien on the house and the loan would be repaid when the person passes away or when the house is sold."

Landlords whose properties have four or fewer units may be eligible.

Karen Blandford, Westminster's manager of housing and community development, said use of the loans at the county level was low.

"In the last 18 months there were three loans countywide. We believe there is more of a need than is being met," she said. "We want to reach out as far as possible. With a local staff person it's a whole lot easier to do marketing, outreach and work one-on-one with people who need assistance."

Fleming said he plans to scour the city, looking for homes in disrepair and mailing information to the owners. He will also speak to local organizations such as church groups and neighborhood associations. He encourages people to let him know of others who may benefit from the loans but are unaware of them, such as elderly relatives or neighbors.

One of his main goals, he said, is to ease people's fears about red tape. He said a short phone call is often enough to see if a person qualifies and if participation in the program is appropriate. Fleming will also help fill out the paperwork. "We'll sit there as long as it takes to help them with it," he said.

So far, no one has applied for a loan, he said, although there have been inquiries. Blandford said the city can administer as many loans as needed.

Fleming is overseeing several other loan programs. The Special Targeted Applicant Rehabilitation Program is similar to the regular rehabilitation loan program, but is aimed at people with lower incomes. No payments are due until the home is sold.

A Lead Hazard Reduction Grant and Loan Program helps homeowners -- and owners of rental properties with up to 100 units -- remove hazardous lead paint from their properties. There is no income limit for the program.

"Entire neighborhoods will benefit if properties are maintained better and are able to be brought up to code," Blandford said.

"One bad house brings everybody down. We want to strengthen all neighborhoods without displacing tenants, and these programs really do help." she said.

For information about the loans, call Ray Fleming at 410- 848-2261, or pick up a brochure at the Office of Housing and Community Development in the Winchester West Building at 56 W. Main St.


Originally published on Mar 28 1999:
http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/editorial/story.cgi?section=archive&storyid=1150070209447

Westminster Housing and Community Dev, Westminster Housing initiatives,

Sunday, March 21, 1999

19990320 My Locational Whereabouts


My Locational Whereabouts

Kevin E. Dayhoff

Westminster, MD 21158

______________________

Saturday, March 20, 1999

Commander Kay Church, Receptionist

225 North Center Street

Westminster, MD 21157-5194

410.386.2102

Dear Commander Kay,

Oh!, Ah, ummmm, Kay - It seems that I’m lost. Recently, I seem to have been dropped off the office building radar screen - on my head. I’ve gone off to find me. If you should happen to find me, could you please tell me where it is that I am. Right now, I may be losing, but I’m making record time.

Meanwhile, please hold all my calls, should I ever again be found on the County Staff reorganized organizational chart, other than under a rock, face down in Longwell Run desperately hugging a bunny with a clump of unopened resignation letters waded up in my mouth. If Hillary Clinton calls, take a message.

If you should find me aimlessly wondering about the halls of the office building, with a shell shock look about my unshaven face, staggering, stuttering, slobbering and muttering to myself, please direct me to safety; - preferably someplace where chocolate covered doughnuts can be found.

Should you, ever hear a voice similar to mine, disseminating from the close proximity of a pounding sound on the inside a trash truck, would you please consider stopping the truck and saving me from the landfill?

In case I am ultimately ground up into veggie burger and fed to the bog turtles, allow me to share with you what a pleasure it has been to serve under you. Thanks !

Sincerely yours,

Uncle Kevin

Remember Kay, always keep your salad shooter at the ready!!

Carroll County Commissioners, Environmentalism EAAB - Carroll County Environmental Affairs Advisory Board, Art literature of the absurd,

Wednesday, March 10, 1999

19990309 The Ant & The Grasshopper

The Ant & The Grasshopper

March 9th, 1999

The Ant and the Grasshopper, the New PC American Version

Original Version

The ant works hard in the withering heat all summer long, building his house and laying up supplies for the winter. The grasshopper thinks he's a fool and laughs and dances and plays the summer away.

Come winter, the ant is warm and well fed. The grasshopper has no food or shelter so he dies out in the cold.

New PC American Version

The ant works hard in the withering heat all summer long, building his house and laying up supplies for the winter.

The grasshopper thinks he's a fool and laughs and dances and plays the summer away.

Come winter, the shivering grasshopper calls a press conference and demands to know why the ant should be allowed to be warm and well fed while others are cold and starving.

CBS, NBC and ABC show up to provide pictures of the shivering grasshopper next to video of the ant in his comfortable home with a table filled with food.

America is stunned by the sharp contrast.

How can it be that, in a country of such wealth, this poor grasshopper is allowed to suffer so?

Then a representative of the NAGB (The National Association of Green Bugs) shows up on Nightline and charges the ant with green bias, and makes the case that the grasshopper is the victim of 30 million years of greenism.

Kermit the Frog appears on Oprah with the grasshopper and everybody cries when he sings "It's not easy being green."

Bill and Hillary Clinton make a special guest appearance on the CBS Evening News to tell a concerned Dan Rather that they will do everything they can for the grasshopper that has been denied the prosperity he deserves by those who benefited unfairly during the Reagan summers.

Richard Gephardt exclaims in an interview with Peter Jennings that the ant has gotten rich off the back of the grasshopper, and calls for an immediate tax hike on the ant to make him pay his "fair share."

Finally, the EEOC drafts the "Economic Equity and Anti- Greenism Act" retroactive to the beginning of the summer. The ant is fined for failing to hire a proportionate number of green bugs and, having nothing left to pay his retroactive taxes, his home is confiscated by the government.

Hillary gets her old law firm to represent the grasshopper in a defamation suit against the ant, and the case is tried before a panel of federal hearing officers that Bill appointed from a list of single-parent welfare moms who can only hear cases on Thursday's between 1:30 and 3 PM.

The ant loses the case.

The story ends as we see the grasshopper finishing up the last bits of the ant's food while the government house he's in, which just happens to be the ant's old house, crumbles around him since he doesn't know how to maintain it. The ant has disappeared in the snow.

And on the TV, which the grasshopper bought by selling most of the ant's food, they are showing Bill and Hillary Clinton standing before a wildly applauding group of Democrats announcing that a new era of "fairness" has dawned in America.

Food for thought.

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