Sunday, January 27, 2013

Today's headlines in the New York Times

IN THIS E-MAIL
World |  U.S. |  Politics |  Business |  Technology |  Sports |  Arts |  New York/Region |  Magazine |  Editorials |  Op-Ed | On This Day


TOP NEWS

A Flood of Suits Fights Coverage of Birth Control

By ETHAN BRONNER
In recent months, federal courts have seen dozens of lawsuits from religious institutions and private employers who say providing birth control to employees would violate their beliefs.

Secret Donors Finance Fight Against Hagel

By JIM RUTENBERG
Conservative groups financed by anonymous donors are running ads against Chuck Hagel, the nominee for secretary of defense, reflecting the continuing effects of the Citizens United decision.
BEARING ARMS

Selling a New Generation on Guns

By MIKE McINTIRE
Threatened by declining participation in shooting sports, gun makers and sellers have poured millions of dollars into a campaign to get firearms into the hands of more, and younger, children.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"Let's be serious. They took a chance on me."
MAYOR MICHAEL R. BLOOMBERG, on Johns Hopkins University, where he flourished despite a lackluster high school record.

WORLD

INTERACTIVE FEATURE: Growth of the Zaatari Refugee Camp

There are more than 300,000 Syrian refugees in Jordan, 73,000 of them in the Zaatari camp.
OPINION
Simon, a humanoid robot, sits for a photograph.
OPINION

Talking, Walking Objects

The future is rich with sensor-based, animated devices to give us affirmation, coach us and just plain keep us company.
WORLD

A City in Egypt Erupts in Chaos Over Sentences

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK and MAYY EL SHEIKH
The government appeared to have lost control of Port Said, a major city, after a court sentenced 21 soccer fans to death and their supporters poured into the streets.

French Capture Strategic Airport in Move to Retake North Mali

By LYDIA POLGREEN and SCOTT SAYARE
French forces took control of the Islamic rebel stronghold of Gao, winning the biggest prize yet in the battle to retake the northern half of Mali.

Rio's Exploding Manholes Menace Residents and Highlight Aging Infrastructure

By SIMON ROMERO and TAYLOR BARNES
Rio de Janeiro, which will host the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics, faces criticism for not doing enough to curb the deadly problem.
U.S.

For 3 Women, Combat Option Came a Bit Late

By ELISABETH BUMILLER and JAMES DAO
For three officers, the ban on women in combat was not so much a glass ceiling as a seemingly bulletproof one that limited their career options within the military.

Focus on Preserving Heritage Can Limit Foster Care for Indians

By DAN FROSCH
A chronic shortage of licensed Indian foster families in many states complicates the ability to allow Indian children to remain connected with their heritage at a turbulent time.

New Hampshire Police Chiefs Hold a 31-Gun Raffle for a Training Program

By JESS BIDGOOD
The New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police defends its decision to raffle off 31 guns in May in the wake of the Connecticut elementary school shootings.
POLITICS

Tom Harkin of Iowa Won't Seek Re-election to Senate

By JEFF ZELENY
The announcement that Senator Harkin, 73, will retire sets the stage for one of the most competitive Senate races next year as Republicans seek to win control from Democrats.

As Plouffe Departs, a West Wing Job Is Redefined

By JACKIE CALMES
The departure of David Plouffe draws attention to a White House office that at once has been crucial to Mr. Obama's presidency yet was nearly eliminated after his re-election.

How This Got to Be a Biden Moment

By MARK LEIBOVICH
As the one major Washington figure who consistently evokes a sense of thrill in what he is doing, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. has achieved a sort of cult status.
BUSINESS

Lincoln's School of Management

By NANCY F. KOEHN
The deliberations over the Emancipation Proclamation built the leadership backbone of Abraham Lincoln, and offer huge lessons for modern executives.
FAIR GAME

Making Them Pay (and Confess)

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON
Mary Jo White, the new head of the Securities and Exchange Commission, has a chance to scuttle the practice of letting companies settle cases without admitting fault.
ECONOMIC VIEW

A New Housing Boom? Don't Count on It

By ROBERT J. SHILLER
Despite noises about a turning point in the housing market, the data doesn't suggest any particular path for future prices.
TECHNOLOGY
DIGITAL DOMAIN

Mixing, Matching and Charging Less for a Phone Plan

By RANDALL STROSS
Republic Wireless keeps its cellphone service prices low via an interesting hybrid: it uses Wi-Fi when customers are in a Wi-Fi area and a 3G network when they are not.
UNBOXED

Dickens, Austen and Twain, Through a Digital Lens

By STEVE LOHR
Big Data is pushing into the humanities, as evidenced by new, illuminating computer analyses of literary history.
WORKSTATION

How to Say 'Look at Me!' to an Online Recruiter

By PHYLLIS KORKKI
Some employers aren't posting jobs these days, choosing instead to search online for the right candidate. So job seekers may need to ask themselves "How searchable am I?"
SPORTS

A Saint in His City: Archie Manning in New Orleans

By SAM BORDEN
The Mannings, the first family of New Orleans quarterbacks, have called the city home since Archie, father of Peyton and Eli, was drafted by the Saints in 1971.
ON BASKETBALL

The Nets' Key Player, and Their Key Pawn

By HOWARD BECK
Despite Brook Lopez's fine season and Dwight Howard's horrid one, an exchange of centers by the Nets and the woeful Lakers may still happen.
76ERS 97, KNICKS 80

The Knicks, Finally All Together, Prove Altogether Lackluster

By TIM ROHAN
Even with their full complement of talented, confident and expensive pieces at their disposal, the Knicks were unable to slow down the 76ers and Jrue Holiday, who scored 35 points.
ARTS

Pure Dance, Pure Finale

By ALASTAIR MACAULAY
Trisha Brown, a leading choreographer for more than 50 years, will present her last two dances at the Brooklyn Academy of Music this week.

Not Like the Old Boss: Hip-Hop's Spirit Guide

By JON CARAMANICA
ASAP Yams is the behind-the-scenes - or not so behind-the-scenes - presence in the career of the expansive hip-hop artist ASAP Rocky.

To Heighten the Art? Take It to Vegas

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
Michael Mayer's new production of "Rigoletto," set in 1960s Las Vegas, will continue the Metropolitan Opera's attempts to wake up its opera revivals.
NEW YORK / REGION

$1.1 Billion in Thanks From Bloomberg to University

By MICHAEL BARBARO
Michael R. Bloomberg, who credits Johns Hopkins University for turning him into a leader, is adding a $350 million gift to four decades of generosity to the school.

The Preppers Next Door

By ALAN FEUER
The prepper movement, which teaches its members how survive the breakdown of civilization, is gaining followers in New York, including the author.

40 Miles to Work, on a Bike

By ABIGAIL MEISEL
More people are riding their bikes into Manhattan, and even the freezing temperatures do not dissuade a few brave souls.
MAGAZINE

The Price of a Stolen Childhood

By EMILY BAZELON
Victims of child pornography can now collect damages directly from those convicted of possessing their images. But how much can restitution help them repair their lives?

How to Make an Ironman Whimper (and Cough)

By BILL DONAHUE
The race to the top of very tall buildings.

Could Cyril Ramaphosa Be the Best Leader South Africa Has Not Yet Had?

By BILL KELLER
The man who was once Nelson Mandela's chosen successor returns to government, this time as a business tycoon.
EDITORIALS
EDITORIAL | THE GUN CHALLENGE

What We Don't Know Is Killing Us

After a 17-year freeze imposed by the gun lobby, government research on the causes and prevention of gun violence must resume.
EDITORIAL

Mr. Cameron's European Fantasy

The British prime minister is ambivalent about his country's future in the European Union, but he can't pretend to have it both ways.
EDITORIAL

The Bird Flu Experiments

Research on the deadly bird flu virus is to resume, but have all earlier concerns been adequately addressed?
OP-ED
OP-ED COLUMNIST

She's (Rarely) the Boss

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
Sheryl Sandberg, the No. 2 executive at Facebook, offers a provocative take on why women are so underrepresented in leadership positions.
OP-ED COLUMNIST

Revolution Hits the Universities

By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Nothing has more potential to let us reimagine higher education than massive open online course, or MOOC, platforms.
OP-ED COLUMNIST

Divided by Abortion, United by Feminism

By ROSS DOUTHAT
How the pro-life movement has learned to love equal opportunity.
SUNDAY REVIEW
NEWS ANALYSIS

Your Biggest Carbon Sin May Be Air Travel

By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL
With President Obama declaring climate change a part of his second-term agenda, all eyes are on the United States on the matter of airlines' carbon emissions.
NEWS ANALYSIS

Who Decides the Laws of War?

By CHARLIE SAVAGE
Can military tribunals charge people with idiosyncratic offenses that are not war crimes under international law?
ON THIS DAY
On Jan. 27, 1967, Astronauts Virgil I. ''Gus'' Grissom, Edward H. White and Roger B. Chaffee died in a flash fire during a test aboard their Apollo I spacecraft at Cape Kennedy, Fla.
*****

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